German Airplane Flick

I know a guy, what doesn’t much care for the Cav…. how about, the Cav, complete with chick-flick prettyboys?

Actually, looks like it’d be a pretty good movie. All those sharp features are actually realistic: the wind itself tended to resculpt your face after a while…

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6 Comments

  1. Mike

     /  February 23, 2008

    I guess I am dense, but what did that have to do with “the Cav”? “The Cav” is the US First Cavalry Division and its associated nutcase ACRs. This was about WWI fighter combat (specifically the Red Baron who is considered to be the best (or one of the best) fighter pilots to have ever lived).

    I know I don’t like “The Cav”, so I am guessing I’m the one you are talking about. But I am missing the connection here. But it doesn’t look like a bad war movie, provided they don’t go “Pearl Harbor” on us.

    Reply
  2. celogo

     /  February 23, 2008

    How cool! Looks like we’ll be renting 🙂

    Reply
  3. blackpine

     /  February 24, 2008

    Richthoffen was a failed cavalry officer. So they sent him to scout in aircraft to keep him out of harms way. When air combat became a tactical reality, he formed the Circus. As in Circus Maximus. A lot of really ballsy pilots in that bunch.

    Reply
  4. blackpine

     /  February 24, 2008

    Follow up, he kept getting thrown from the horse.

    Reply
  5. Mike

     /  February 24, 2008

    I did not know that. But then again, he was smart enough not to pull some of that noble pull to stay in. Cavalry against Machine Guns is a no winner.

    Reply
  6. Interesting that you mention their features. I have read an interesting comment on all the flyboys in that war. The rate of death was extraordinary, so the stress was warp 9. This author pointed out that at the end of the war all of the survivors were still in their early 20’s for the most part. If you look at their pictures, there is not a one of them that looks like they are under 35. What could cause this, he speculates?

    Super high stress on a daily basis is one contributor. The pilots got to the point that the “newbies” were ignored by the vets because they knew that nearly all of them would be dead within a few days. The physical stress was another factor. Not just the wind, but very few people can fly for long at 16,000 feet without oxygen. The higher you could fly, the better your chances at survival, but the physical toll was enormous. The high G environment got worse as the war continued and the planes got faster and better able to take the strain, but those guys had never heard of a G Suit. Take a look at the pictures sometimes, and you really would think that all those young people are men close to MY age. It is really striking.

    Reply

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